CJL regularly hosts visiting scholars of Jewish law, Jewish studies, law, philosophy, literature, and sociology from America, Israel, and Europe. These scholars, experts in their fields, bring the perspectives of the intellectual climate in their home countries and help foster an international community of scholars. Visiting scholars conduct research, participate in the graduate and undergraduate fellowship programs, and contribute to the intellectual life of the Center.

2018-2019

Yehudah Mirsky is associate professor of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis. He studied at Yeshivat Har Etzion and Yeshiva College and received rabbinic ordination in Jerusalem. He graduated from Yale Law School, where he was an editor of the law review, and completed his PhD in Religion at Harvard. He worked in Washington as an aide to then-Senators Bob Kerrey and Al Gore, and at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and served in the Clinton Administration as special advisor in the US State Department's human rights bureau. From 2002-2012 he lived in Jerusalem and was a fellow at the Van Leer Institute and Jewish People Policy Institute and a grass-roots activist. He has written widely on politics, theology and culture for a number of publications including The New York Times, The New Republic and The Economist, The Daily Beast, and The Washington Post. After the attacks of September 11 he served as a volunteer chaplain for the Red Cross. He is a member of the board of Ha-Tenuah Ya-Yerushalmit, the movement for a pluralist and livable Jerusalem. He is the author of the widely-acclaimed volume, Rav Kook: Mystic in a Time of Revolution (Yale University Press).

2017-2018

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. Professor Lorberbaum will visit CJL as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.

2016-2017

Arye Edrei, Professor at Tel Aviv University Law School, teaches courses on Jewish law, law and ideology, and the legal profession. He was a Harry Starr Fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University and a Golda Meir Fellow at Hebrew University. He earned his LL.B., LL.M., and Dr. Jur. at Hebrew University, where for three years he was on the Rector’s List for Excellence in Lecturing. He has served as a visiting professor at University of Toronto Law School, Cardozo Law School, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and was a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2005. Dr. Edrei has published numerous articles on Jewish law, including “Law, Interpretation, and Ideology: The Renewal of the Jewish Laws of War in the State of Israel,” Cardozo Law Review; “Spirit and Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Force,” Theoretical Inquires in Law; and “Command or Error: On the Duty to Obey in Halakhic Thought,” Tel Aviv University Law Review. He is also co-editor of Diné Israel, a journal of Jewish law, published by Tel Aviv University. 

2015-2016

 Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. Professor Lorberbaum will visit CJL as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.

 

2014-2015

 

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. Professor Lorberbaum will visit CJL as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.
 

2013-2014

Isaiah Gafni is the Sol Rosenbloom Professor of Jewish History at the Hebrew University. He has served as Visiting Professor at numerous universities abroad, among them, Harvard, Yale, and Brown, and he was also honored as the Louis Jacobs Fellow in Rabbinic Thought at Oxford University, where he delivered a series of lectures on the Jewish Diaspora in the Greco-Roman period. Dr. Gafni has written extensively on a broad range of topics relating to the social, religious, and cultural history of the Jews in late antiquity, with a particular stress on aspects of Jewish self-identity and relations with other ethnic and religious communities. His publications include The Jews of Babylonia in the Talmudic Era: A Social and Cultural History, for which he was awarded the 1992 Holon Prize in Jewish Studies; Babylonian Jewry and Its Institutions in the Period of the Talmud; and Land, Center, and Diaspora: Jewish Constructs in Late Antiquity. Professor Gafni will visit CJL in Spring 2014 as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.

2012-2013

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. Professor Lorberbaum will visit CJL in Spring 2013 as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.

2011-2012

Arye Edrei, Professor at Tel Aviv University Law School, teaches courses on Jewish law, law and ideology, and the legal profession. He was a Harry Starr Fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University and a Golda Meir Fellow at Hebrew University. He earned his LL.B., LL.M., and Dr. Jur. at Hebrew University, where for three years he was on the Rector’s List for Excellence in Lecturing. He has served as a visiting professor at University of Toronto Law School, Cardozo Law School, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and was a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2005. Dr. Edrei has published numerous articles on Jewish law, including “Law, Interpretation, and Ideology: The Renewal of the Jewish Laws of War in the State of Israel,” Cardozo Law Review; “Spirit and Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Force,” Theoretical Inquires in Law; and “Command or Error: On the Duty to Obey in Halakhic Thought,” Tel Aviv University Law Review. He is also co-editor of Diné Israel, a journal of Jewish law, published by Tel Aviv University.

Hannah Kasher is an Associate Professor of Jewish Philosophy at Bar-Ilan University. Her scholarly interests include medieval Jewish philosophy and Jewish philosophical exegesis of the Bible. Professor Kasher edited Joseph ibn Kaspi's Shulhan Kesef and she is the author of Heretics in Maimonides’ Teaching (in press), as well as numerous scholarly articles. She is on the editorial board at Da‘at and serves as director of the Schneeweiss Chair for Jewish Philosophy and Ethics. Professor Kasher received her Ph.D. in 1983 from Bar-Ilan University.

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. 

Shira Wolosky received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in Comparative Literature in 1981, and was an Associate Professor of English at Yale University before moving to the Hebrew University in 1985, where she is Professor of English and American Literature.  Her work includes Emily Dickinson: A Voice of War; Language Mysticism, The Art of Poetry (Oxford UP 2002), "Nineteenth Century American Poetry," in The Cambridge History of American Literature IVMajor Voices in Nineteenth-Century American Women's Poetry; Defending Identity (co-authored with Natan Sharansky); Poetry and Public Discourse in Nineteenth-Century America Palgrave Macmillan, 2010); The Riddles of Harry Potter, and other writings on literature, religion, and literary theory.  She was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2000, a Fellowship in the School of History at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton in 2007, and the Drue Heinz Visiting Professorship of American Literature at the Rothermere Institute, Oxford, 2008 and 2011.

Zvi Zohar is the Chauncey Stillman Professor of Sephardic Law and Ethics at Bar Ilan University, where he teaches in the Faculty of Law and in the Faculty of Jewish Studies. Professor Zohar is a Senior Research Fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute of Advanced Judaic Studies in Jerusalem, where he heads the Alan A. and Loraine Fischer Family Center for Contemporary Halakha. He was also a founding faculty member of Paideia – The European Institute for Jewish Studies in Sweden.

Professor Zohar is interested in all aspects of Jewish life and thought, especially in modern times. His areas of special research include the sociology, anthropology, and history of Jewish law and halakha; the culture and creativity of Sephardic-Oriental rabbis in modern times; and the history of the Jews of the Middle East in modern times. Among numerous other books and articles, he is the author of Tradition and Change (Hebrew), Transforming Identity: The Ritual Transition from Gentile to Jew—Structure and Meaning, and The Luminous Face of the East – Studies in the Legal and Religious Thought of Sephardic Rabbis of the Middle East (Hebrew).

2010-2011

Warren Zev Harvey is a professor in the department of Jewish thought at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the author of many studies on medieval and modern Jewish philosophy, including Physics and Metaphysics in Hasdai Crescas (1998). Professor Harvey's research has focused, among other things, on the influence of Greek and Roman philosophy upon the Rabbis, the connection between poetry and philosophy in the works of Solomon ibn Gabirol and Judah Halevi, the Maimonidean elements in the teachings of Moses Mendelssohn and Solomon Maimon, and the land of Israeli in Jewish philosophy. Professor Harvey, who received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Columbia University, has held visiting appointments at Yale, McGill University, Georgetown University, and University of Pennsylvania. He received the prestigious EMET Prize in the humanities in 2009.
Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. 

2009-2010

Arye Edrei, Professor at Tel Aviv University Law School, teaches courses on Jewish law, law and ideology, and the legal profession. He was a Harry Starr Fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University and a Golda Meir Fellow at Hebrew University. He earned his LL.B., LL.M., and Dr. Jur. at Hebrew University, where for three years he was on the Rector’s List for Excellence in Lecturing. He has served as a visiting professor at University of Toronto Law School, Cardozo Law School, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and was a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2005. Dr. Edrei has published numerous articles on Jewish law, including “Law, Interpretation, and Ideology: The Renewal of the Jewish Laws of War in the State of Israel,” Cardozo Law Review; “Spirit and Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Force,” Theoretical Inquires in Law; and “Command or Error: On the Duty to Obey in Halakhic Thought,” Tel Aviv University Law Review. He is also co-editor of Diné Israel, a journal of Jewish law, published by Tel Aviv University. Professor Edrei will visit CJL in Spring 2010.
Isaiah Gafni is the Sol Rosenbloom Professor of Jewish History at the Hebrew University. He has served as Visiting Professor at numerous universities abroad, among them, Harvard, Yale, and Brown, and he was also honored as the Louis Jacobs Fellow in Rabbinic Thought at Oxford University, where he delivered a series of lectures on the Jewish Diaspora in the Greco-Roman period. Dr. Gafni has written extensively on a broad range of topics relating to the social, religious, and cultural history of the Jews in late antiquity, with a particular stress on aspects of Jewish self-identity and relations with other ethnic and religious communities. His publications include The Jews of Babylonia in the Talmudic Era: A Social and Cultural History, for which he was awarded the 1992 Holon Prize in Jewish Studies; Babylonian Jewry and Its Institutions in the Period of the Talmud; and Land, Center, and Diaspora: Jewish Constructs in Late Antiquity. Professor Gafni will visit CJL in Spring 2010 as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law.
Shalom E. Holtz is assistant professor of Bible at Yeshiva University. He holds a B.A. (summa cum laude) from Harvard University (1999) and a doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania (2006), both in Near Eastern languages and civilizations. He is the author of Neo-Babylonian Court Procedure (Brill, 2009) and several articles on the relationship between Mesopotamian law and literature and the literatures of biblical and post-biblical Israel. His current research is on courtroom metaphors in the Hebrew Bible. 

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is the author of Subordinated King: Kingship in Classical Jewish Literature and Apples of Gold in Silver Settings: Maimonides on Parables, Philosophy, and Law. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. He is visiting Cardozo in Fall 2009 and Spring 2010, when he will serve as a mentor for CJL Graduate Fellows.

2008-2009

Gerald Blidstein is a professor in the Department of Jewish Thought at Ben-Gurion University. Professor Blidstein will be visiting CJL as the Ivan Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law, and will teach a course on "Maimonides on the Theory and Authority of Law." His research interests include the history of halakhah, philosophy of halakhah, Maimonides, ethics and halakhah, prayer, aggadah, and political thought. His publications include Political Concepts in Maimonidean Halakhah (Hebrew); Authority and DIssent in Maimonidean Law (Hebrew); and Studies in Halakhich and Aggadic Thought (Hebrew). Professor Blidstein received the coveted Israel Prize in Jewish Thought in 2006.

Shahar Lifshitz is a Senior Lecturer on the Faculty of Law at Bar-Ilan University. Dr. Lifshitz specializes in contracts and family law and is the author of Civil Regulation of the Spousal Relationship (Hebrew, forthcoming); “Oppressive Contracts: A Jewish Law Perspective,” 13 Journal of Law and Religion (2008); and “Distress Exploitation Contracts in the Shadow of the No Duty to Rescue,” University of North Carolina Law Review (2008). Dr. Lifshitz will visit CJL in Spring 2009. 

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. In 2007, his book, Image of God: Halakhah and Aggadah, was awarded the prestigious Goldstein-Goren Award for best recent book in the field of Jewish thought. He is visiting Cardozo in Fall 2008 and Spring 2009, where he is leading the Graduate Fellows Seminar and conducting research for CJL’s book series The Jewish Legal Tradition.

Aharon Shemesh is a professor of Talmud at Bar-Ilan University. His research interests include halakhah in the Dead Sea Scrolls and rabbinic literature. His publications include Punishments and Sins from Scripture to the Rabbis (Hebrew); "Scriptural Interpretations in the Damascus Document and their Parallels in Rabbinic Midrash"; and "Halakhah at Qumran: Genre and Authority." Professor Shemesh will visit CJL in Spring 2009.

Shmuel Trigano is a sociologist, philosopher, and professor of religious and political sociology at Paris X-Nanterre. Professor Trigano, the author of numerous books, is a specialist in the Jewish tradition and contemporary Judaism and is President of l'Observatoire du monde juif and director of the College of Jewish Studies at the Alliance Israelite Universelle. Professor Trigano will visit CJL in Spring 2009.

2007-2008

Arye Edrei, Professor at Tel Aviv University Law School, teaches courses on Jewish law, law and ideology, and the legal profession. He was a Harry Starr Fellow at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University and a Golda Meir Fellow at Hebrew University. He earned his LL.B., LL.M., and Dr. Jur. at Hebrew University, where for three years he was on the Rector’s List for Excellence in Lecturing. During the Spring 2008 semester at Cardozo, he will teach “Halakhah and Zionism: Law and Ideology.” Dr. Edrei has published numerous articles on Jewish law, including “Law, Interpretation, and Ideology: The Renewal of the Jewish Laws of War in the State of Israel,” Cardozo Law Review; “Spirit and Power: Rabbi Shlomo Goren and the Military Ethic of the Israel Defense Force,” Theoretical Inquires in Law; and “Command or Error: On the Duty to Obey in Halakhic Thought,” Tel Aviv University Law Review. He is also co-editor of Diné Israel, a journal of Jewish law, published by Tel Aviv University.
David Flatto served as the inaugural Fellow of Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies in 2006-07. David received a J.D. from Columbia University Law School, as well as ordination from RIETS, and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Rabbinics at Harvard University. His dissertation focuses on separation of powers in rabbinic literature.

Yair Lorberbaum is a professor of law at the Bar-Ilan University Faculty of Law, specializing in Jewish law, Jewish thought, jurisprudence, and philosophy. He has also been a member of the Shalom Hartman Institute for Advanced Studies in Jerusalem since 1991. Dr. Lorberbaum has been a visiting professor at University of Pennsylvania, Yale, Princeton, and Cardozo, and was a research fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He is visiting Cardozo in Fall 2007, where he is leading the Graduate Fellows Forum on Interdisciplinary Research and conducting research for CJL’s book series The Jewish Legal Tradition.

Daniel Statman, a senior member of the Department of Philosophy at Haifa University, specializes in ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of law, and Jewish philosophy. He has numerous publications in English and Hebrew and has lectured at universities in Europe, North America, and Israel. Professor Statman will join Cardozo in Fall 2007 as University Scholar-in-Residence.

Azzan Yadin, Associate Professor in the Department of Jewish Studies at Rutgers University, specializes in early rabbinic legal interpretation, with a special emphasis on the relationship between midrash and non-interpretive legal traditions in early rabbinic literature. He is the author of Scripture as Logos: Rabbi Ishmael's Midrash. Professor Yadin received his B.A. in Philosophy and Jewish Thought from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and his Ph.D. in Rabbinic Literature from the University of California, Berkeley and the Graduate Theological Union.

2006-2007

Hanina Ben-Menahem, Professor of Law, Montesquieu Chair in Comparative Law and Legal History, at the Hebrew University Faculty of Law, will serve as the inaugural Meyer Visiting Scholar in Comparative Jewish Law during the Fall 2006 semester. Professor Ben-Menahem studied law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and received his D. Phil. from Oxford in 1978. From 1995 to 2000, he served as the director of Hebrew University Faculty of Law’s Institute for Research in Jewish Law. For the past five years, he has spent the spring semester at Harvard Law School as Gruss Visiting Professor of Talmudic Civil Law. His areas of expertise include jurisprudence, Talmudic law, philosophy of Jewish law, and the legal thought of Maimonides. He is the author of Judicial Deviation in Talmudic Law: Governed by Men, Not by Rules, and has edited Controversy and Dialogue in the Halakhic Sources (Hebrew) and Authority, Process and Method: Studies in Jewish Law.
David Flatto received a J.D. from Columbia Law School and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Rabbinics at Harvard University. During the 2005-2006 academic year, David was the Joseph S. Gruss Scholar-in-Residence at New York University Law School. 

Shahar Lifshitz will serve as Visiting Professor of Law and Visiting Fellow of Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies during the 2006-07 academic year. Dr. Lifshitz, a Senior Lecturer on the Faculty of Law at Bar-Ilan University, will teach "Marriage and Contract, Marriage as Contract," which will explore the historical, philosophical, and normative intersections of family law and contract law. During the 2005-06 academic year, Dr. Lifshitz was Berkowitz Fellow at NYU Law School.