The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy

The Cardozo Business Law Society 

The Cardozo Tax Law Society

The Jewish Student Association

Muslim Student Association

invite you to:

Taxing the Church

This panel discussion will include legal scholars who will discuss Professor Edward Zelinsky's new book "Taxing the Church."

The book:

---Explores the taxation and exemption of churches and other religious institutions, both empirically and normatively

---Reveals that churches and other religious institutions are treated diversely by the federal and state tax systems

---Focuses on church-state entanglements with respect to taxing or exempting churches and other sectarian entities

---Discusses improvements that can be made in legal and tax policy trade-offs, such as the protection of internal church communications and the expansion of the churches' sales tax liabilities

---A clear, balanced, and comprehensive treatment of the topic that is broadly accessible to tax policymakers, lawyers, nonlawyers, judges, tax specialists, and even those with no background in the subject

Moderator:

Professor Laura Cunningham of Cardozo Law School

Panelists:

Professor Miranda Perry Fleischer of the University of San Diego

Professor Brian Galle of Georgetown University

Professor Daniel Hemel of the University of Chicago

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

6 - 8 p.m.

Jacob Burns Moot Courtroom

Cardozo School of Law

55 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

CLE Credit Available


The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy
invites you to: 

Democracy Talks: Experts Discuss Gill v. Whitford

Room 1008
Monday, November 6, 2017
12:00 - 1:15 p.m.

Join Professor Kate Shaw and the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy for a panel discussion of Gill v. Whitford, a blockbuster Supreme Court case that could have profound and far-reaching effects on our democracy. The panel will feature Thomas Wolf and Laura Royden of the Brennan Center for Justice, and Jeff Wice, an expert on redistricting in New York.

This panel is the inaugural event in "Democracy Talks." The series will consist of periodic conversations about the state of politics, leadership and civic engagement.

Lunch will be served.

Contact ewu1@law.cardozo.yu.edu<mailto:ewu1@law.cardozo.yu.edu> for details.


SCOTUS First Monday: The 2017 October Supreme Court Term

Monday, September 25, 2017
12:00 - 1:15 p.m.
 
Room 423
Cardozo School of Law
55 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003
 
Lunch will be served
no RSVP necessary
 
A lively panel discussion will focus on notable Supreme Court cases to be decided in the upcoming October term, including the Trump immigration cases. 
 
Panelists: 
•Professor Kate Shaw, Co-Moderator
•Professor Michele Adams, Co-Moderator
•Professor Michael Herz
•Professor Peter Markowitz
•Professor Ekow Yankah
•Professor Deborah Pearlstein

The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy and the Cardozo Law Institute in Holocaust and Human Rights invite you to:

Hate Speech and the Culture Wars
 
Monday, September 18, 2017
6:00-7:30 p.m.
 
Reception to follow panel
7:30-8:30 p.m.
 
Jacob Burns Moot Court Room
Cardozo School of Law
55 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003
 
Panelists: 
Professor, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
•Susan Benesch, Faculty Associate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, and Director of the Dangerous Speech Project.
•Stanley Fish, Floersheimer Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law
•Robert C. Post, Sterling Professor of Law, Yale Law School
•Michel Rosenfeld, University Professor of Law and Comparative Democracy, Justice Sydney L. Robins Professor of Human Rights, Cardozo School of Law
•Ekow N. Yankah, Professor, Cardozo School of  Law
•Kate Shaw (Moderator), Associate Professor, Cardozo School of Law
 
Hate speech regarding race, religion, ethnicity or national origin, poses vexing constitutional challenges. Most democracies prohibit speech that incites to hatred, whereas the United States draws the line at speech that incites to violence. Critics find the American approach too permissive and its counterpart too restrictive. 
 
Given the present worldwide surge in racism, xenophobia, Islamophobia and anti-Semitism; given that in more recent times purveyors of hate speech are found within or close to the centers of political power; and, given the novel challenges posed by the spread of hate speech through new media such as Twitter and Facebook; it becomes imperative to re-examine the extant approaches to hate speech, and to explore whether there may be suitable alternatives better adapted to evolving political and technological trends.
 
This event is sponsored by the Floersheimer Center and CLIHHR in conjunction with the Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory.
 
This program has been approved for 1.5 transitional/non-transitional New York State CLE credits in the category 'Areas of Professional Practice.' 
 
 

Controlling the High Cost of Justice: Perspectives From the Federal Judiciary

April 3, 2017

Federal judges will engage in a discussion regarding U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero's important Cardozo Law Review essay urging changes in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. 

Moderator:

Hon. Robert A. Katzmann, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Panelists:

Hon. Richard M. Berman, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. John G. Koeltl, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. Loretta A. Preska, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. Jed S. Rakoff, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Co-Sponsored By:

Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy
Cardozo Law Review
Federal Bar Council
Federal Courts Committee of the New York City Bar Association
New York County Lawyer's Association Federal Courts Committee


Staying on the Rails: Direct Constitutional Checks on the President

March 28, 2017

In Federalist 51, James Madison famously observed that in constructing a government, "the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself."  The federal Constitution is an extended effort to solve this riddle.  The election of Donald Trump and the early months of his presidency have seen particular attention focused on three constitutional provisions designed to enable the government to "control itself":

·       the Emoluments Clause, which is the basis of a pending lawsuit against the President;

·       the Impeachment Clause, under which the President can be removed from office by Congress for "Treason, Bribery, or other High Crimes and Misdemeanors"; and

·       the 25th Amendment, which creates a mechanism to remove the President if he "is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office."

Panelists:

John D. Feerick, Norris Professor of Law and Former Dean, Fordham University School of Law

Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC;
Attorney for the Plaintiff, in Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington v. Trump

Michael Herz, Arthur Kaplan Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law

Richard Painter, S. Walter Richey Professor of Corporate Law, University of Minnesota Law School; former Associate Counsel to the President

Michael Waldman, President, Brennan Center for Justice

Moderator:

Kate Shaw, Associate Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law


Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, a discussion about the best-selling book with author Irin Carmon


The Age of Deference: the Supreme Court, National Security, and the Constitutional Order, a Discussion about  David Rudenstine's Groundbreaking Book

September 19, 2016

Moderated by

Adam Liptak, Supreme Court Correspondent for The New York Times

Panelists

Michael Mukasey, Former U.S. Attorney General, Partner at Debevoise & Plimpton

Deborah Pearlstein, Associate Professor of Law, Cardozo School of Law

Steven Shapiro, Legal Director for the American Civil Liberties Union

Matthew Waxman, Professor of Law, Columbia Law School, and former National Security Council member under George W. Bush

Opening remarks by:
David Rudenstine, Former Cardozo Dean and Sheldon H. Solow Professor of Law


Ten Years The Chief: Examining a Decade of John Roberts on the Supreme Court

Thursday October 15th, 2015

10:00- 11:15 am: John Roberts and Constitutional Interpretation

Moderated by Professor Kate Shaw
Panelists:
Roberta Kaplan: Partner, Paul Weiss
Brianne Gorod: Constitutional Accountability Center
Lincoln Caplan: The New Yorker and Yale Law School
Professor Marci Hamilton: Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

11:30 am- 12:45 pm: John Roberts and the Judicial Process

Moderated by Professor Deborah Pearlstein
Panelists:
Professor Michelle Adams: Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
Professor Elise Boddie: Rutgers School of Law
Professor Jamal Greene: Columbia University Law School
Professor Richard Epstein: New York University School of Law

1 pm – 2 pm: Luncheon

2:15- 3:30 pm: The Administrative Role of the Chief Justice

Moderated by Professor Michael Herz
Panelists:
Kedar Bhatia: Bracewell & Giuliani and SCOTUSblog
Professor Edward Hartnett: Seton Hall School of Law
Professor Sarah Staszak: City College of New York
Professor Erin Hawley: University of Missouri School of Law and Former Roberts Clerk

4:00- 5:15 pm: John Roberts and Statutory Interpretation

Moderated by Professor Alexander Reinert
Panelists:
Pratik Shah: Partner, Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld
Professor David Strauss: University of Chicago School of Law
Professor Jonathan Adler: Case Western Reserve University School of Law
Anton Metlitsky: O’Melveny & Myers and Former Roberts Clerk

5:15- 6:00 pm: Wine and Cheese Reception 


Conversations on the Constitution:  The 2015-2016 Supreme Court Term And Beyond

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Professor Jonathan Rohr

Professor Kate Shaw

Professor Ekow Yankah

with Professor Michelle Adams moderating

Dean Melanie Leslie and the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy invite you to:

Controlling the High Cost of Justice: Perspectives From the Federal Judiciary

Federal judges will engage in a discussion regarding U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero's important Cardozo Law Review essay urging changes in the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. 

April 3, 2017

Moderator:

Hon. Robert A. Katzmann, Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Panelists:

Hon. Richard M. Berman, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. John G. Koeltl, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. Loretta A. Preska, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Hon. Jed S. Rakoff, United States District Judge, Southern District of New York

Co-Sponsored By:

Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy
Cardozo Law Review
Federal Bar Council
Federal Courts Committee of the New York City Bar Association
New York County Lawyer's Association Federal Courts Committee