March 2, 2018 - Cardozo’s students continue to impress and last weekend, the Heyman Center’s team won Best Draft at the Ninth Annual Regional Transactional LawMeet competition, held at Widener University Commonwealth Law School in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Twelve schools competed in the regional round including Northwestern and Georgetown.

The Cardozo team is made up of Heyman Scholars Noah Weingarten (3L), David Borsack (2L) and Arif Soto (LLM) and Professor Jillian Gautier, director of the Heyman Center and Adjunct Professor Law for ITRANS, served as their coach.

The teams in this year’s LawMeet were asked to draft and negotiate the acquisition agreement for a $2.25 billion transaction.

The case involves the acquisition of all the outstanding capital stock of Volt Process Design Company (Volt) by an affiliate of Beijing Global Investors Limited (BGI). Volt is a process control software company based in Philadelphia. It is controlled by its Founder, Dr. Ronald Richards, and his children. BGI is a Beijing-based private equity investment firm. While BGI invests primarily inside China, its newest fund is pursuing a strategy of investing in privately-held companies based in North America or Europe that can benefit from BGI’s network to expand their businesses in China.

“I am proud of this team not just for bringing home an award, but more importantly for all of their hard work over the last few months. Through this competition, the students learned important skills needed to practice as transactional attorneys, including drafting corporate deal documents, negotiating with opposing counsel, and communicating effectively with clients. It’s quite impressive to watch law students draft and speak intelligently about sophisticated deal terms and business concepts, which in real deals are often handled by senior attorneys,” said Professor Gautier. 

LawMeets was founded in 2010 by Drexel University law professor Karl Okamoto as a way to deliver practical skills exercises to law students interested in transactional law. He organized the first Transactional LawMeet, with 11 participating teams, in 2010.