New York Law Journal: Professors Barbara Kolsun and Lee Sporn Write About the Many Hats of a Fashion Lawyer

Fashion has achieved the status of a truly global industry, and the rapid growth of fashion law is now catching up to the challenges facing mass-market fashion brands

Prof. Zelinsky Writes About Bringing Back the Electoral College in the Huffington Post

Huffington Post - Never in my (now considerable) lifetime has the American electorate been as dissatisfied as it is today with the major parties’ apparent presidential nominees. Indeed, there is an argument that never in American history has the electorate been this unhappy with the choices it confronts.

Prof. David Rudenstine in The Nation On Why Scalia Became So Prominent - And Why His Influence Will Not Last

The Nation - He was celebrated because he used his position as a Supreme Court justice to mobilize conservatives—but his views were antithetical to what is most enduring about American legal and political aspirations.

Cardozo Law 3L Elise Bernlohr Publishes Op-Ed on Eviction Law in Crain's New York

Crain's New York - The most troubling piece of this law is its temporary-closing-order provision. Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says he will reevaluate the use of this practice, which lets the city ask a judge to close a premises without notice to the affected parties.

Prof. Ekow Yankah's Op-Ed in The New York Times: When Addiction Has a White Face

The New York Times - When crack hit America in the mid-1980s, for African-Americans, to borrow from Ta-Nehisi Coates, civilization fell.

Prof. Pearlstein Cited in NY Times on Guantanamo

The New York Times - Deborah Pearlstein, a professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York, wrote that Mr. Obama might not want to create such a precedent. “Which does the president think is more important?” she wrote. “The strategic importance of closing Guantánamo on his watch? Or the structural, historical importance of holding the line on the expansion of presidential power in the United States?”

Professor Yankah in The New Yorker: 'Why NCAA Athletes Shouldn't Be Paid'

The New Yorker - Two weeks ago, as Americans were settling into the harvest comfort of football Saturdays, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit issued a ruling in the antitrust suit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The decision drew blood on both sides.

Prof. Edward Zelinsky on Donald Trump's Tax Plan

The Fiscal Times - Yet the biggest winners under Trump’s plan would be, well, people just like Trump: America’s richest citizens. That’s because he’s proposing a big reduction in income taxes for married couples earning at least $300,000, as well as a plan to eliminate the estate tax, which only kicks in at about $10 million per couple, said Edward Zelinsky, a law professor at the Cardozo School of Law, who specializes in tax issues.

Professor Brett Frischmann: Will the "Internet of Things" Result in Predictable People?

The internet of things is envisioned to be a “programmable world” where the scale, scope, and power of these tools is amplified as we become increasingly predictable: more data about us, more data about our neighbours, and thus more ways to shape our collective beliefs, preferences, attitudes and outlooks.

Professor Ekow Yankah in The New Yorker: Seeing Walter Scott

The New Yorker - Maybe it was Walter Scott’s fault. Maybe he did something to make Officer Michael Slager, of the North Charleston Police Department, in South Carolina, shoot him in the back.