Dean Diller Receives AALS Rhode Award for Achievement in Public Service

Recognizing Dean Matthew Diller’s leadership in legal education and public service, the AALS Section on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities awarded him with the 2014 Deborah L. Rhode Award. Dean Diller has a decades-long record of distinguished work in public service, which includes legal representation, scholarly research, public advocacy, and innovative leadership in legal education.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Professor Dan Ravicher's Challenge to Gene Patents

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a major case that invalidates patents on two genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The case was brought by Professor Dan Ravicher of Cardozo School of Law, along with the ACLU.

Prof. Ekow Yankah's Op-Ed in The New York Times: When Addiction Has a White Face

When Addiction Has a White Face

By Ekow Yankah

February 9, 2016 The New York Times - When crack hit America in the mid-1980s, for African-Americans, to borrow from Ta-Nehisi Coates, civilization fell. Crack embodied instant and fatal addiction; we saw endless images of thin, ravaged bodies, always black, as though from a famined land. And always those desperate, cracked lips. Our hearts broke learning the words “crack baby.”

Judge - El Salvadoran Colonel Can Face Charges in Spain; Carolyn Patty Blum, Director of CLIHHR, Worked on the Case with the CJA

Patty Blum, a human rights lawyer who helped persuade Spanish authorities to take up the case, praised the judge for advancing a complex case with international implications. "It's a significant finding about the role of these kinds of illegal acts committed conspiratorially by military regimes," said Blum.

Rabbi J. David Bleich and Prof. Arthur Jacobson Publish 'Jewish Law and Contemporary Issues'

Examining topics such as divorce, war, rabbinic confidentiality and cloning, the book carefully delineates the issues presented in each case, showing the various positions taken by rabbinic scholars, clarifying areas of divergence, and analyzing reasons for disagreement.

Prof. David Rudenstine's Op-Ed in Orlando Sentinel: Horrible Choices Don't Make Us More Secure

Orlando Sentinel - After the attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., late last year, one might have a powerful inclination to give a green light to government surveillance hoping that such surveillance would detect terrorist plots before more people are murdered.

Prof. Felix Wu Speaks to Bloomberg Radio on the Expiration of the 'Safe Harbor' Agreement

Felix Wu, a law professor at the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, and Donald Aplin, managing editor for privacy and data security for Bloomberg Law, discuss the expiration of the "safe harbor" agreement between the United States and the European Union.

Prof. Marci Hamilton in The Dickinson Press: Lists of Accused ND Priests Still Under Wraps

The Dickinson Press - "The problem is that the vast majority of survivors need into their, really, adulthood to be able to come forward. The average age is about age 42, so the current numbers in North Dakota keep out most of the victims," said Hamilton...

Prof. Ekow Yankah in the Associated Press - Experts: Activists' Indictment Shows Disapproval of Videos

ABC News/Associated Press - "It's really citizens scolding what they thought was a political investigation. Look at what they indicted them on," said Ekow N. Yankah, a law professor at the Cardozo School of Law in New York.

Prof. Deborah Pearlstein in The New Yorker: Is Obama Serious About Closing Guantánamo?

The New Yorker - In earlier times, Congress did not interfere with Administration plans to release Nazis, Viet Cong, or, more recently, war-on-terror prisoners held in Iraq. (Professor Deborah Pearlstein, of Cardozo Law, has given a thorough account of this history.)