Dean Diller Receives AALS Rhode Award for Achievement in Public Service

Recognizing Dean Matthew Diller’s leadership in legal education and public service, the AALS Section on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities awarded him with the 2014 Deborah L. Rhode Award. Dean Diller has a decades-long record of distinguished work in public service, which includes legal representation, scholarly research, public advocacy, and innovative leadership in legal education.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Professor Dan Ravicher's Challenge to Gene Patents

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a major case that invalidates patents on two genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The case was brought by Professor Dan Ravicher of Cardozo School of Law, along with the ACLU.

Professor Peter Markowitz: Ending the Immigration Insanity

Huffington Post - They say the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

Professor Marci Hamilton in Mother Jones - These Laws Let Accused Rapists Off the Hook

Mother Jones - "Rape is a crime of shame and humiliation," explains Marci Hamilton, an expert on statutes of limitations who teaches law at Yeshiva University.

Professor Katharine Tinto in the LA Times: Judges Question ATF Stings that Lure Suspects Into Fictitious Stickups

LA Times - "There's the sense that the tide may be shifting," said Katharine Tinto, law professor at Cardozo School of Law in New York who has tracked stash-house robbery cases.

Professor Katharine Tinto in the NY Times: More Judges Question Use of Fake Drugs in Sting Cases

New York Times - “Is this where we want to put our law enforcement resources — giving people the opportunity to commit a crime and then putting them in prison for decades?” asked Katharine Tinto, a professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York.

National Center for Access to Justice at Cardozo Law: Hawaii Ranks Well in Access to Justice

West Hawaii Today - The report, by the National Center for Access to Justice, measured how accessible the justice system is in four categories: attorney access for low-income litigants; support for self-represented litigants; support for litigants with limited language proficiency and support for people with disabilities.

The National Center for Access to Justice in the News: Equal Justice Also Means Equal Access

Journal Courier - The National Center for Access to Justice oversees The Justice Index, which uses data from four categories to compare states’ access to the justice system — especially for the poor and those with disabilities.

Cardozo Law Justice Index in the News: Connecticut Courts Rank Highest for Access

The Ledger Independent - "Across the country, there are millions of people who don't have legal representation and face other barriers in their abilities to protect their interests and enforce their rights," said David Udell, the center's executive director. "Our Justice Index is our online resource in identifying best practices ... ensuring that people do have access to the justice system."

Cardozo Law Justice Index in the News: Illinois Ranked 49th for How Court System Serves Disadvantaged

The Daily Republican - "Across the country, there are millions of people who don't have legal representation and face other barriers in their abilities to protect their interests and enforce their rights," said David Udell, the center's executive director. "Our Justice Index is our online resource in identifying best practices ... ensuring that people do have access to the justice system."