Dean Diller Receives AALS Rhode Award for Achievement in Public Service

Recognizing Dean Matthew Diller’s leadership in legal education and public service, the AALS Section on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities awarded him with the 2014 Deborah L. Rhode Award. Dean Diller has a decades-long record of distinguished work in public service, which includes legal representation, scholarly research, public advocacy, and innovative leadership in legal education.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Professor Dan Ravicher's Challenge to Gene Patents

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in a major case that invalidates patents on two genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. The case was brought by Professor Dan Ravicher of Cardozo School of Law, along with the ACLU.

Professor Brett Frischmann discusses his work on human-focused Turing Tests on the Algocracy and Transhumanism Podcast

Professor Brett Frischmann was recently interviewed on the Algocracy and Transhumanism Podcast discussing his work on human-focused Turing Tests, a test for intelligence in a computer, requiring that a human being should be unable to distinguish the machine from another human being by using the replies to questions put to both.

Dean Leslie Announces Professor Myriam Gilles as New Vice Dean

Professor Myriam Gilles has been appointed vice dean of Cardozo School of Law for a one-year term effective August 29, 2016.

NY Times: Salvadoran Court Overturns Wartime Amnesty, Paving Way for Prosecutions; Professor Carolyn Patty Blum Worked on Salvadoran Human Rights Cases

The New York Times - “Every rock that was in the path is being thrown to one side,” said Carolyn Patty Blum, the senior legal adviser to the Center for Justice and Accountability, an organization based in San Francisco that has filed Salvadoran human rights cases against military officers in courts outside the country.

Professor Richard Bierschbach Quoted in The Wall Street Journal: "Contractor Ordered to Create PSAs After Manslaughter Conviction"

Mr. Bierschbach said he attributes the change to a growing frustration with corporate sentencing, in which there is no human being to imprison or personally punish.

“People are finding that a little bit unsatisfying,” he said. Judges may be looking for outcomes that feel more meaningful to victims, he said.

EU, U.S. Agree on Data Sharing Pact: Professor Felix Wu Quoted in USA Today

The new agreement could still face long-term attack by European privacy groups, said Professor Felix Wu, director of the Data Law Initiative at Cardozo Law School at Yeshiva University in New York City. The European Court could still decide that the extent of U.S. government surveillance makes the new Privacy Shield inadequate, he said. “It will probably take at least a couple of years though for a challenge to the Privacy Shield to reach the European Court of Justice, so it will be a while before we get a final answer to these questions,” Wu said.

Professor Felix Wu Comments in the AP on New Data-Sharing Rules for EU and U.S.

Associated Press - Professor Felix Wu of Cardozo Law School in New York said "someone is surely going to challenge it" but that on balance he anticipated the European Court would back Privacy Shield.

Cardozo Hosts National Criminal Law and Procedure Conference

On July 11-12, for the second year in a row, Cardozo hosted CrimFest, an annual national works-in-progress conference for criminal law and procedure scholars.

Professor Stewart Sterk Quoted in Journal News on Legality of 'Blockbusting'

The Journal News - Stewart Sterk, a law professor and director of the Center for Real Estate Law Policy at Yeshiva University's Cardozo Law School, said the state has many legal options. But even if the state takes action, what then? "The question is, how do you go about enforcing whatever prohibition you have?" Sterk said.