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Interview with Richard M. Joel
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Court of Appeals Inaugurates New Moot Court Room
NYS ATTORNEY GENERAL AWARDS $200,000 FOR CLINIC
Libby Pataki and Richard Joel Help Rededicate Brookdale Center
Innocence Project Moves to Larger Space
Women and Human Rights are Focus of Conference
Archbishop Tutu Receives Advocate for Peace Award
Cardozo Receives $2.25 Million in Holocaust Claims Case
Wartime Legislation and Supreme Court Decisions Provoke Discussions
Class of 2006 Enrolls; Largest Applicant Pool Ever
1L Publishes Book
JULY 2003 BAR RESULTS ARE HIGHEST YET
Intellectual Property Program Sponsors Panels, Conferences, and Special Speakers
Bauer Lecture Celebrates 200th Anniversary of Marbury
US DISTRICT COURT JUDGES OFFICIATE AT PAULSEN COMPETITION
88 COMPETE IN NEGOTIATION COMPETITION
Cardozo Hosts Conference on Clergy Abuse
Corporate Scandals Subject of Spitzer and Glodschmid Talks
Ethics Center Honors Attorney Representing Clients on Death Row; Capital Punishment is Subject of Annual Lecture
Library Collaborates with Barnes & Noble Table
Auction Raises more than $25,000 for Public Service Stipends
Bet Tzedek Hosts Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Difficult Clients
HOT-BUTTON ISSUE WITH FEDERAL JUDGES—SENTENCING GUIDELINES—SPURS DEBATE


Court of Appeals Inaugurates New Moot Court Room

Chief Judge John M. Walker, Jr. greets Dean David Rudenstine. Judges Richard Wesley and Dennis Jacobs look on.

Although "it is not common or ordinary for the Second Circuit to move for anything," said Chief Judge John M. Walker, Jr., the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit heard its October 8 docket in the new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room "to recognize a fine law school in its moments of celebration." Cardozo, said Judge Walker, is "one of the great law schools in the country."

This highly unusual, if not extraordinary, event marks perhaps the first time that the Court has sat at a law school moot court room. Judge Walker made his decision to hear cases at Cardozo after he received a request from Dean David Rudenstine, who wrote that the occasion would mark the official opening of the Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, the heart of Cardozo’s $40 million renovation and redesign. Judges Dennis Jacobs and Richard C. Wesley also sat on the panel, which heard six cases.

"I cannot imagine a more fitting tribute to Jacob Burns, a founder of Cardozo, than to have the Court of Appeals sit in our new moot court room. This historic session magnificently marks Cardozo’s coming of age," said Dean Rudenstine. Students and special guests filled the court room during the morning and at a luncheon hosted by the dean; the three judges dined with members of the Moot Court Honor Society editorial board and the faculty.

NYS ATTORNEY GENERAL AWARDS $200,000 FOR CLINIC

A former telecommunications executive recently agreed to forfeit $1.5 million in profits made from trading "hot" shares in initial public offerings under a deal negotiated by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer. Part of the settlement, $200,000, has been awarded to Cardozo for a securities arbitration law clinic. According to Spitzer’s office, settlements from various cases have benefited more than 10 law schools nationwide, to help investors bring claims. According to Dean Rudenstine, the new clinic will come under the aegis of The Heyman Center and will be supervised by Prof. Lela Love, director of the Kukin Program in Conflict Resolution.

Libby Pataki and Richard Joel Help Rededicate Brookdale Center

(From left) Board member Sheldon Solow, Board Chairman Earle I. Mack, YU President Richard M. Joel, Libby Pataki, Board Treasurer Barry Shenkman, and Dean David Rudenstine.

Libby Pataki, representing her husband, NY Governor George E. Pataki, joined Dean David Rudenstine, Yeshiva University President Richard M. Joel, Cardozo Board Chairman Earle I. Mack, Board Treasurer Barry Shenkman, and Board member Sheldon Solow in cutting a large red ribbon at the official rededication of Brookdale Center, Cardozo’s home at 55 Fifth Avenue. "Cardozo’s growth has been remarkable," said Mrs. Pataki. "We need ethically trained lawyers well versed in the balance of legal theory and practice ... and this is Cardozo’s special strength."

The event, part of President Joel’s investiture celebration, marked the grand opening of the new lobby and Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, as well as the recent opening of the Law School’s redesigned library and renovated classrooms. More than 300 alumni, friends, and special guests attended.

Describing the five-year, $40 million capital improvement program, Dean Rudenstine said, "The result, which is nothing short of a transformation, creates a physical facility that more closely reflects the level of excellence that has always been the hallmark of Cardozo’s intellectual character and the experience it provides." He expressed gratitude to Yeshiva University for its commitment to the project, to the Cardozo Board of Directors for its leadership, and to the many alumni, parents, and friends who contributed generously to the capital campaign.

The lobby level of the 11-story law school building, including the Jacob Burns Moot Court Room, was designed by Davis Brody Bond Architects. Funding for the new courtroom was provided by Mr. Shenkman, president of the Jacob Burns Foundation and a grandson of Jacob Burns, who once was chairman of the Law School’s Board.

Innocence Project Moves to Larger Space

In a sign of Cardozo’s continuing growth, the Innocence Project is moving to new office space at 100 Fifth Avenue, three blocks north of the Law School. The Project staff and directors will begin the spring semester in the new space, allowing the program to expand its important efforts in using DNA evidence to free the wrongfully convicted. It will also make possible the hiring of additional lawyers and staff to increase significantly the number of cases the Project can take on and the scope of its public education efforts.

According to Nina Morrison, executive director, "The law clinic remains the core program of the Innocence Project, as it has in the past. The new agreement between the Law School and the Project provides stability to the program, allowing it to expand and strengthen its work, while maintaining its close ties to Cardozo." Student carrels will be at 100 Fifth; the Innocence Project seminar will be taught at the Law School and at 100 Fifth.

Women and Human Rights are Focus of Conference

Federal District Judge Vicki Miles-LaGrange, United States District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma, and the first African- American judge in the Tenth Circuit, discussed the postgenocide judicial culture of Rwanda and touched on problems with the country’s developing legal system in her keynote address at Engendering Justice: Women Shaping the Future of International Human Rights. Women play an important role in the democratization in Rwanda, she explained, and its constitution provides that at least 30% of all decisionmaking positions in the country must be granted to women. "I believe the political will is there," she said. But, she added, the situation concerning the status of the courts is very grave, and the country faces serious human rights challenges.

Other discussions explored how the rights of women are being violated around the world, and how they are pursuing justice in the areas of political participation, labor rights, and immigration and migration. Legal conflicts between human rights and cultural practices in such traditions as female genital mutilation also were debated. The panelists represented a variety of political and legal organizations and academic institutions including Amnesty International, The Center for Reproductive Rights, and Sarah Lawrence College. The Cardozo Women’s Law Journal and Cardozo Journal of Comparative and International Law cosponsored the conference.

Archbishop Tutu Receives Advocate for Peace Award

Harpreet K. Mann ’03, editor-in-chief, Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution, and Aaron S. Kiviat ’03, president, International Law Students Association, present Archbishop Desmond Tutu with the 2003 International Advocate for Peace Award.

"When you stand out in a crowd, it’s because you are carried on the shoulders of others," Nobel Prize winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu said as he received the 2003 International Advocate for Peace Award from the Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution and the International Law Students Association. He accepted the award last spring "on behalf of unsung heroes and heroines who work tirelessly for peace."

Archbishop Tutu chaired South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which probed human rights violations that occurred between 1960 and 1994. He is currently chancellor of the University of Western Cape and holds honorary degrees from Harvard, Oxford, and Columbia, among others. He has written a number of books, his latest being No Future Without Forgiveness.

The archbishop discussed his lifelong crusade for peace—among the reasons students chose him the 2003 award winner—by weaving together the threads of tolerance and unity. "True security does not come from the barrel of a gun but rather through reconciliation," he said. "An enemy is a friend waiting to be made.

"Until Israel is recognized as a sovereign state ... and equally until a Palestinian state is viable and respected ... unless these two entities exist," Archbishop Tutu said, "there is no hope for peace." He cited other areas of conflict, including Northern Ireland, Chechnya, Colombia, and Bosnia. The global population, however, is one, he said.

"Your humanity is bound up with the humanity of others, whether you like it or not.... One day we will realize we are family. That all belong—black, white, short, tall, beautiful, not so beautiful ... gay, lesbian, straight, Arafat, Sharon—all belong.... We must realize God’s dream ... the rainbow people of God’s family."

Cardozo Receives $2.25 Million in Holocaust Claims Case

Stuart Eizenstat

In Benisti v. Banque Paribas, one of many Holocaust restitution claims cases filed since 1996, United States District Court Judge Sterling Johnson, Jr. allocated $2.25 million of unclaimed funds to Cardozo. The monies are part of the settlement offered by JP Morgan in the case brought in late 1997 by Holocaust survivors and their heirs against several French banks, as well as Chase, JP Morgan, and Barclays Bank. The grant will make possible an organized program and center for Holocaust studies and human rights.

"I view this gift to Cardozo as one of public trust, and we will factor that into our plans for the center, which is founded with the memories of the plaintiffs in mind," said Dean Rudenstine. "I am extremely proud that Judge Johnson has chosen us for this distinction."

In the class action suit, attorney Kenneth McCallion and a team of six, which included Richard Weisberg,Walter Floersheimer Professor of Constitutional Law, proved that the banks had indeed victimized their Jewish clients.

"Cardozo was chosen the beneficiary because people know about our Holocaust Claims Restitution Clinic, our courses on the Holocaust, our conferences, and the books and articles we’ve produced about this tragic period," explained Professor Weisberg. His book Vichy Law and the French Holocaust brought him to the attention of McCallion, an adjunct professor who with Lucille Roussin runs the clinic and teaches the corresponding course. Prof. Malvina Halberstam, who successfully argued a case in the 2nd Circuit against SNCF, the French national railroad, was also involved in the case.

Wartime Legislation and Supreme Court Decisions Provoke Discussions

Cory Booker and Nadine Strossen

New legislation and several landmark cases decided by the US Supreme Court were the subject of panels organized by members of the faculty and student organizations. Of particular interest to the community was Grutter v. Bollinger, in which the Supreme Court upheld the University of Michigan Law School’s affirmative action policy, and ruled that race can be used in admission decisions. The case was debated in several panels and informal discussions.

In another landmark case, Lawrence v. Texas, the Court struck down the Texas sodomy law, expanding the constitutional right to privacy. Prof. Ed Stein, codirector of the new Program in Family Law, Policy, and Bioethics, organized panels around this case as well.

The Patriot Act, the Bush administration’s signature post-9/11, counter-terrorism legislation, was debated at a panel sponsored by the American Constitution Society and at American Democracy in Times of War, the inaugural conference of the Public Law, Policy & Ethics Journal. Nadine Strossen, president, American Civil Liberties Union, joined eminent constitutional scholars, practitioners, journalists, and politicians at the conference, and Cory Booker, former Newark, NJ, councilman, received the Journal public service award.

Class of 2006 Enrolls; Largest Applicant Pool Ever

An eclectic mix of students from a variety of careers, undergraduate institutions, and backgrounds became members of the class of 2006 this fall. Among them are a talent scout, associate editor of a fashion magazine, patent agent, chemist, construction foreman, and lead medical assistant of an emergency room. They represent 110 undergraduate institutions; New York University is the most widely represented with 22 graduates. Other top-feeder schools are Columbia/ Barnard, Cornell, University of Pennsylvania, the State University of New York, and, for the first time, The University of California with 12 students. Approximately 20% of the class comes from the Ivy League.

According to Dean Robert Schwartz, nearly 4,700 people applied for admission to the class, an 18% increase over last year. The new 1Ls arrived with a median LSAT score of 162, two points above last year’s median; the top quarter of the class has a median score of 164, putting them in the top 7% nationally.

Applications to the LL.M. program were up as well; a total of 207 applied for admission and 32 enrolled. Of these students, 22 entered the Intellectual Property Program and 24 received law degrees abroad. The new class comes from 17 countries, including Argentina, China, India, Thailand, Ecuador, Peru, and many western European countries.

At the welcoming lunch Dean Rudenstine urged students to ask questions and get involved in public service. He described the primary forces shaping a Cardozo education as traditional legal doctrine, legal theory, and practical experience. He was joined by featured speaker Chief Judge Michael B. Mukasey, US District Court for the Southern District of NY, who was introduced by his son, Marc Mukasey ’93, assistant US attorney for the Southern District of NY. Orientation was highlighted by the now traditional afternoon boat cruise on the Hudson.

1L Publishes Book

Marc Mukasey ’93 and his father, Judge Michael Mukasey

Haroon Moghul ’06, an American-born Muslim who visited Saudi Arabia and Pakistan after graduating from high school, recently published My First Police State (xlibris, Random House 2003), described as "a defiant look at Saudi Arabia and Pakistan before and after the events of September 11, 2001."

Haroon says, "It’s a comedic commentary and a biting satire about travels through ... the Middle East.... I wrote this book because of the coordinated attacks on Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Casablanca, Morocco [in May 2003]. More accurately, ... because of the Saudi government’s hopeless (or was that helpless?) reaction to said attacks, an indicator of how far the Muslim world was falling—and how fast."

JULY 2003 BAR RESULTS ARE HIGHEST YET

This year’s Bar exam results for Cardozo first-time test takers in July were the highest ever recorded by the Law School. Of the 253 taking the exam, 223 passed for a pass rate of 88.1% against an overall state pass rate of 77.6%. This is the first time that Cardozo’s results are more than 10 points above the state average. The results are 5.6 points above Cardozo’s 2002 rate.

Intellectual Property Program Sponsors Panels, Conferences, and Special Speakers

The Intellectual Property Law program generates many campus events—from panels and conferences on patent and copyright law to those on fashion and sports law. Below are highlights of the past two semesters.

David Samson ’93

David Samson ’93 (at right), president of the World Series champion Florida Marlins spoke to students at a Practice Profile luncheon and sat on a panel, "Play Ball: The Health of Major League Baseball: An Examination of the Major Issues Involving Management, Unions, and the Collective Bargaining Process." Other participants were Spencer Weber Waller, director, Institute of Consumer Antitrust Studies, Loyola University of Chicago School of Law; Thomas Ostertag, senior vice president and general counsel, Major League Baseball, Office of the Commissioner; and David Feuerstein ’01, associate, Boies Schiller & Flexner. Armed with free tickets, a group of students later headed to Shea Stadium for a Mets vs Marlins game.

Prof. Susan Crawford

Prof. Susan Crawford and Alan Davidson, Center for Democracy and Technology, were among the participants at ICANN, ccTLD, and the Legacy Root: Domain Name Lawmaking and Governance in the New Millennium.

Bruce Lehman

Bruce Lehman, former commissioner of the US Patent and Trademark Office, spoke to students and faculty at an IP Society Roundtable.

Gerald Sobel

Gerald Sobel of Kaye Scholer was a panelist at "Has the Federal Circuit Lived Up to its Purpose of Providing Uniformity and Predictability in Patent Law?" Other participants included R. Polk Wagner, Morgan & Finnegan; Stephen B. Judlowe, Morgan, Lewis & Brockius and a member of the Cardozo Board of Directors; Pasquale Razzano, Fitzpatrick, Cella, Harper & Scionto; Herbert Schwartz, Fish and Neave; John F. Sweeney, Morgan & Finnegan; and Arun Chandra ’98, Jones Day.



The music business team and its structure—who is responsible for what, and how revenue is calculated and shared—were discussed by music industry insiders on a panel convened by the Recording Academy Entertainment Law Initiative at Cardozo. (From left) Michael Glasser ’04, editor in chief, AELJ; Trevor Gale, vice president, writer/publisher relations, SESAC (a performing rights organization); Marsha Vlasic, agent, M.V.O. Limited (representing The Strokes, Courtney Love, Kelly Osbourne); Saguit Saad, Esq., Epstein, Levinsohn, Hurwitz & Weinstein; (in back) Griff Morris, Esq., Recording Academy, vice president, Central Region; Jeff Battaglia, manager, JBM Management (representing Disturbed, Alkaline Trio); Jon Marcus, executive director, NY Chapter, Recording Academy; and Deborah Murad ’04, symposia editor, AELJ.

Prof. Cynthia Ho

Prof. Cynthia Ho, Loyola University of Chicago School of Law, presented "Innovation and Inventorship: A Tale of Biopiracy, Patents, and International Law" as part of the Intellectual Property Speakers Series, which features IP scholars who address cutting-edge issues in the field.



The Sports and Entertainment Law Society and the Intellectual Property Law Society cosponsored the immensely popular "Legal Issues in the Fashion Industry." Featured speakers included (from left) David Jacoby, Phillips Nizer; Theodore C. Max, Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo; Barbara Kolsun ’82, Kate Spade; Michael Colosi, Kenneth Cole Productions; and Samantha Hetherington, O’Melveny & Myers.





Bauer Lecture Celebrates 200th Anniversary of Marbury



John T. Noonan, Jr., professor emeritus at University of California at Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law and a senior judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, spoke on "The Progeny of Marbury" at the Uri and Caroline Bauer Memorial Lecture. The lecture marked the bicentennial of the celebrated US Supreme Court decision in Marbury v. Madison, which, according to Judge Noonan, the court may have decided wrongly in 1803, when it established the power of judicial review over federal statutes.




US DISTRICT COURT JUDGES OFFICIATE AT PAULSEN COMPETITION

Three US district court judges presided over the Paulsen Moot Court Competition, which was the first student event held in the new Jacob Burns Moot Court Room. Finalists and judges are (from left) Audrey Roofeh ’05, Mark Schwed ’05, Neelanjan Choudhury ’05, Jeffrey Anbinder ’05, Hon. Charles Breyer, Northern District of California; Hon. Lawrence Kahn, Northern District of New York; and Hon. Richard Conway Casey, Southern District of New York. Finalist Cheryl Fuchs ’05 is not pictured.

88 COMPETE IN NEGOTIATION COMPETITION

The 15th Annual Cardozo/ ABA Intraschool Negotiation Competition, held in the new lobby, boasted 44 teams totaling 88 contestants. Four teams took prizes: Lindsey Brass ’05 and Jeff Cassin ’05; David Brand ’05 and Lauren Lipson ’05; Anthony Musillami ’04 and Samantha Zenack ’04; and Kavin Edwards ’05 and Keith Sklar ’05.

Cardozo Hosts Conference on Clergy Abuse

Walter V. Robinson

Victims’ advocates, survivors, attorneys, law enforcement personnel, academics, and Catholic Church administrators participated in the groundbreaking First National Conference on Clergy Abuse. Organized by Prof. Marci Hamilton and Frank J. Nebush, Jr., Esq., chair, National Conference Committee on Clergy Abuse and chief public defender in Oneida County, NY, the two-day event provided a wealth of information for attorneys involved in clergy abuse cases in both the criminal and civil arenas.

Pulitzer Prize winner Walter V. Robinson, assistant managing editor of The Boston Globe and editor of its investigative journal, who led the charge to expose abuse within the Church, moderated a roundtable. Kathleen L. McChesney, executive director, Office of Child and Youth Protection, US Conference of Catholic Bishops, and Kenneth V. Lanning, FBI (retired), spoke at plenary sessions. The conference was cosponsored by Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), Child Sexual Abuse Litigation Group, American Trial Lawyers Association, and the National Conference Committee on Clergy Abuse.

Corporate Scandals Subject of Spitzer and Glodschmid Talks

(From left) Samuel Heyman; Ronnie Heyman, secretary of the Cardozo Board; SEC Commissioner Harvey Goldschmid; and Prof. Charles Yablon, director, The Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Center on Corporate Governance.

Two government leaders in the prosecution and prevention of corporate abuses, New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer and US Securities and Exchange Commissioner Harvey Goldschmid, visited the Law School and shared their insights from the front lines. The two lectures, sponsored by The Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Center on Corporate Governance, delved into similar issues, but each reflected the speaker’s personal and professional perspective.

"As attorneys, we failed to live up to our mandate," began Spitzer. He then described the evolution of his thinking on federalism and how it impacted his work as attorney general. Contemporary federalists support strong states’ rights and a less powerful federal government. While at Harvard in the early 1980s, Spitzer said he believed federalism would lead to a balkanization of law enforcement, and, he joked, those strongly in favor of it were at his academic rival, Yale. However, he said he has since changed his perspective.

When Spitzer became attorney general in 1999, he said, "This new federalism is a wonderful, wonderful thing."He was determined to make aggressive use of the autonomy and power that lie with individual states.

One of his first initiatives was a set of actions against large power plants in states whose uncontrolled emissions dirty New York air. Then he tackled antitrust and immigration.

Eliot Spitzer

Amid recent corporate scandals, the attorney general’s office is focused on corporate governance. Spitzer lamented the growing strength of the "imperial CEO," who makes decisions without the checks and balances of boards and audit committees, and auditors who paint an appealing picture of a corporation’s finances rather than an accurate one. He also objected to the relationship that has developed between the underwriters and analysts, saying the "firewall was breached." With analysts now fully integrated into the "pitch," the information they provide is no longer independent or reliable.

Spitzer advised that corporate attorneys need to focus on defining and serving the client, while remembering that shareholders, not management, are the client. He also called on institutional investors to re-engage in corporate oversight to protect their investment.

Goldschmid said he believes that "The Sarbanes- Oxley Act, signed on July 30, 2002, provides the right national framework for our current healing process. Accountability and deterrence are absolutely essential." The commissioner also explained that it is important not to interfere with a corporation’s entrepreneurial spirit and to remember their needs for confidentiality.

According to Goldschmid, Section 307 of the Act enhances the lawyer’s role as gatekeeper, changes the current programs and procedures, and takes major and dramatic steps in reporting.

Both speakers ended their respective talks on a positive note. Spitzer concluded that his office has been effective in addressing the problems of corporate governance. According to Goldschmid, the US system has the strength to come out of scandal and heal and reform itself.

Ethics Center Honors Attorney Representing Clients on Death Row; Capital Punishment is Subject of Annual Lecture

From left) Denny LeBoeuf, Barry Scheck, and Franklin Zimring

Denny LeBoeuf, director, Capital Post-Conviction Project of Louisiana, was honored with this year’s Access to Justice Award for her work for those underserved by the justice system. LeBoeuf, who began representing capital defendants in 1989, works in state and federal courts, primarily in Louisiana, at trial, on direct appeal, and in postconviction. She is especially interested in the litigation of mental health issues and in how race and poverty increase the burden carried by some clients.

She is pictured here with Prof. Barry Scheck and Prof. Franklin E. Zimring, Boalt Hall, University of California at Berkeley, at the award ceremony, which followed the annual Jacob Burns Ethics Center Lecture. In his address, "How Capital Punishment Ended in Europe and Could End in the United States," Professor Zimring explored conflicting American values on the death penalty and offered guidance for death penalty opponents.

Library Collaborates with Barnes & Noble Table

Tabletalk, a joint venture with Barnes & Noble, Cardozo’s on-site book store, brought well-known authors to a luncheon series that marked the opening of the redesigned Chutick Law Library. Writers of recently published fiction and nonfiction books relevant to the legal community included Court TV’s Catherine Crier, shown here signing The Case Against Lawyers. Other authors who participated were Prof. Owen Fiss, Yale Law School, author of A Way Out: America’s Ghettos and the Legacy of Racism; best-selling novelist Phillip Margolin, Ties that Bind, and George Washington University Prof. Allan Gerson, The Price of Terror: How the Families of Pan Am Flight 103 Brought Libya to Justice.

Auction Raises more than $25,000 for Public Service Stipends



The annual SBA Goods and Services Auction is traditionally a big source of school spirit, as well as stipends for students taking summer jobs in public service. Dinners with favorite teachers, luxury goods, and sports tickets were the perennial favorites as the dollars flowed at both the silent auction and the live auction, led by Richard Brierly of Christie’s. The big money maker? Lunch and a visit with Prof. Marci Hamilton to the US Supreme Court for the term’s opening arguments brought in $1,500. The auction raised more than $25,000. Additional generous support from the David Berg Foundation and others allowed Cardozo to give nearly 50 stipends to students last summer.


Bet Tzedek Hosts Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Difficult Clients

Prof. Joan Beder and Margaret Diaz-Cruz

"The Challenges of the Difficult Client: An Interdisciplinary Conference for Advocates" attracted lawyers, academics, social workers, and health and human services professionals. Panelists at the event sponsored by Bet Tzedek Legal Services Clinic included Prof. Joan Beder, Wurzweiler School of Social Work; and Margaret Diaz-Cruz, director of the stipendiary program, Isaac H. Tuttle Fund.




HOT-BUTTON ISSUE WITH FEDERAL JUDGES—SENTENCING GUIDELINES—SPURS DEBATE



Arguments for and against the Federal Sentencing Guidelines and the recently passed sentencing law, the Feeney Amendment, made for a lively debate organized by students of the Federalist Society. Critics of the guidelines and the new amendment, many of whom are federal judges, argue that they violate the separation of powers and push judges into handing down harsher sentences. Proponents such as guest panelist (far left) Eric Jaso, trial attorney, US Attorney’s Office for the District of NJ, and a former member ex-officio of the US Sentencing Commission, believes the guidelines are necessary to ensure predictable, consistent, and equal justice. Alan Vinegrad (center), partner, Covington Burling, former US attorney for the Eastern District of New York, said that the guidelines deprive federal judges of any ability to "treat differently situated defendants differently." Prof. Daniel Crane (at right) moderated.


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Prof. Ed Stein (left) and Prof. Anthony Varona, Pace Law School and former general counsel and legal director, Human Rights Campaign, discussing Lawrence v. Texas. Other panelists were Prof. John McGinnis, Northwestern Law School, formerly of the Cardozo faculty; and Prof. Dale Carpenter, University of Minnesota Law School, coauthor of an amicus brief in Lawrence v. Texas for the Republican Unity Coalition. Prof. Michael Herz moderated.






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Festival Latino, an annual party hosted by the Latin American Law Students Association (LALSA), featured dancing and traditional Latin foods. Periangilly Beltre ’04, vice president, LALSA, presents the Most Influential Latino in the Law Award to Hon. Reinaldo E. Rivera, associate justice of the Second Department, Appellate Division, Supreme Court of the State of New York.








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Ruth Fletcher, Keele University, UK, chaired a roundtable on campus on the "Medicalised Body in Law and Culture" at the three-day conference cosponsored with the Law, Culture, and Humanities Association and organized by Prof. Peter Goodrich and Prof. Austin Sarat, Amherst College. Other discussions and presentations covered topics ranging from corporate responsibility and the end of the rule of law to legal reading of classic literary texts. The conference attracted 350 participants.