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around CAMPUS


Former Cardozo Associate Dean Ascends to YU Presidency
Cardozo Team Competes in Europe
Supreme Court Cites AELJ Again
Dean Announces Center for Public Service Law
Renovated Library Opens
Former Mayor Ed Koch Greets New Class
Nine Participate in New Labor and Employment Law Externship
Paulsen Moot Court Competition Addresses 8th Amendment Issues
On-Campus Interviewing Season One Of The Busiest Ever
Justice Hugh Laddie Explores Global Impact of IP Law
New Public Affairs Breakfast Forum Features NYC Leaders
Talk and Art on Spinoza
Student Wins ABA National Writing Contest
Law Revue Laughs In Both Semesters
Conference on China and the WTO Held
A Busy Semester for Intellectual Property and Dispute Resolution...
...And The Ethics Center, Among Other Programs

Former Cardozo Associate Dean Ascends to YU Presidency
Richard M. Joel Richard M. Joel, president and international director of Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life, is coming home as Yeshiva University's fourth president. Mr. Joel, who was associate dean for business affairs at Cardozo from 1980 to 1988, will begin his tenure in June, succeeding Dr. Norman Lamm, who will become chancellor of the University and will remain Rosh HaYeshiva of its affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS). The Cardozo faculty greeted Joel's appointment by adopting a resolution that reads, "The Law School faculty greets with joy the return of its prodigal son." Mr. Joel, in turn, made the Cardozo faculty the first he chose to visit after announcement of his appointment.
Mr. Joel, who began his career as an assistant district attorney in the Bronx, holds both a B.A. and a J.D. from New York University, where he was a Root-Tilden Scholar. He is a distinguished Jewish communal leader and thinker and an experienced administrator and fundraiser. He is a graduate of the YU High School for Boys; his wife, Esther, holds a Ph.D. from Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology; and of his six children, Avery and Penny are graduates of Yeshiva College and Stern College respectively, and Ariella attends Stern. Avery is currently studying at RIETS.
When addressing the Cardozo faculty, Joel emphasized that he was not a scholar but an educator whose primary goal in accepting the presidency is to bring nobility and quality to the YU experience for students, faculty, and administrators.

Cardozo Team Competes in Europe
A Cardozo moot court team was invited to the regional oral round of the European Law Moot Court (ELMC) competition in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, marking only the second time that a US team has been invited to this international competition. Cardozo is among 40 teams selected from more than 150 on the basis of written submissions. Visiting Professor Frank Emmert is advisor to the team of Dimiter Blyangov, David Epstein, Justin Lilien, Liza Schaeffer, Marisa Mercandetti, and Maria Rubinos, who argued a problem on an array of European legal issues, including intellectual property and antitrust. The competition is sponsored by the European Union, the government of Portugal, and several international law firms as well as the European Court of Justice. The winning teams from the four regional finals will present oral arguments in March before judges from the Court of Justice and the Court of First Instance.

Supreme Court Cites AELJ Again
The US Supreme Court cited Cardozo's Arts and Entertainment Law Journal in its recent decision in Eldred v. Ashcroft, up-holding the 1998 law that extended copyright terms by an additional 20 years. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's opinion for the Court cited a paper from the symposium, "The Constitutionality of Copyright Term Extension," held at Cardozo in 2000. AELJ was first cited by the Supreme Court in 1994 (Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music), and has been cited several times since.

Dean Announces Center for Public Service Law
In January, Dean Rudenstine announced the founding of a Center for Public Service Law.
"There is nothing more important for lawyers, law students, and law professors than serving the greater public good," he says. "The Cardozo Center for Public Service Law will emphasize our school's commitment to this ideal and help students find meaningful ways to engage in public service." Nancy Kramer '83, who has worked in the office of career services for many years, will direct the center.
Cardozo's program for public service law is already rich with panels and symposia, clinics, career opportunities, internships, clerkships, public interest stipends, and a loan repayment assistance program. The new center will work with the Jacob Burns Center for Ethics in the Practice of Law, the newly founded Cardozo Public Law, Policy and Ethics Journal, and the very active Public Interest Law Students Association. The center will also develop new programs and promote outreach to government agencies, federal and state judges and courts, and not-for-profit organizations. It will seek closer ties to agencies and departments at all three levels of government in New York, the greater metropolitan area, and Washington, DC; improve relationships with not-for-profit organizations that serve the public; and assist Cardozo graduates in the private sector to use their professional talents to advance the public interest.

Renovated Library Opens
Jaye Seidlin, Erica Benjamin, Lynn Wishart, Rachel Warren, Prof. Stewart Sterk, and Dean David Rudenstine At a ribbon-cutting ceremony just after students returned from Thanksgiving vacation, the Dr. Rebecca and Lillian Chutick Law Library reopened, fully altered and beautiful after a six-month renovation. Chosen for their close involvement with the project, six Cardozo people, each representing an important constituency, wielded scissors to open the new facility. (From left) Jaye Seidlin '03, SBA president; Erica Benjamin '02, who worked on furniture design and selection; Lynn Wishart, director of the Law Library; Rachel Warren '92, Cardozo Board member and member of the building committee; Prof. Stewart Sterk; and Dean David Rudenstine. (See also story on p.19)

Former Mayor Ed Koch Greets New Class
The Honorable Edward I. Koch and Leana E. Amaez '05 The Honorable Edward I. Koch and Leana E. Amaez '05
When students choose to come to Cardozo, among the lures is its location in New York City. Who better, then, to greet the incoming class of 1Ls than the consummate New Yorker--former New York City mayor Edward I. Koch? At an orientation luncheon preceding the traditional boat cruise sponsored by the SBA, Cardozo's class of 2005 heard about New York, the law, the latest movies, and the best theaters in which to see them.
The former mayor ad-dressed an incoming class of 261 men and women aged 20 to 49 drawn from an applicant pool that jumped to nearly 4,000, up almost 40 percent against a national average of 26 percent. The class, which is 53 percent women and 21.5 percent minority, is the strongest academically in Cardozo's history, with a median LSAT score of 160 and a median GPA of 3.47. The class of 2005 represents 113 undergraduate institutions and 31 states. The largest feeder school is Cornell, represented by 16 students, followed by Columbia/Barnard with 15, University of Pennsyl-vania with 14, and 10 each from NYU and SUNY Binghamton.
Those coming from other careers include a psychotherapist, literary agent, city planner, congressional legislative aide, engineer, actuary, economist, social worker, documentary film director, cavalry troop commander, and a rap singer. Some hold advanced degrees in such areas as comparative literature, bioethics, psychology, and city planning.
As for incoming LL.M. candidates, there were 34 students--18 in intellectual property and 16 in general studies--coming from 13 countries and the US. Five received J.D. degrees from Cardozo in June 2002 and are continuing on to obtain masters of laws in IP.

Nine Participate in New Labor and Employment Law Externship
Prof. Daniel Silverman has taught labor law at Cardozo for many years. Now he is supervising a new Labor and Employment Extern-ship and teaching the seminar on advanced labor law that goes with it. Professor Silverman, counsel at Skadden Arps, was for 20 years the regional director of the New York office of the National Labor Rela-tions Board. President Clinton appointed him in 1993 to serve as acting general counsel for the NLRB.
Nine students accepted into the program are working this spring in law firms and agencies on labor and employment issues. Each spends 12 to 15 hours a week at the NLRB office in Manhattan, Brooklyn, or Philadelphia; District Council 37; Orrick Harrington; Levy Rattner; or Eisner and Associates, where they work on significant litigation and research projects. Each will write a paper in an area of special interest. Silverman indicated that sports, disadvantaged workers, and other relevant labor issues were among the topics chosen.
According to Silverman, Cardozo students have shown considerable interest in labor law, and the ex-ternship is tapping into that interest. "Students are expressing great enthusiasm for the work and the em-ployers as well as the classroom component. Externships are a great way for students to plan for their futures and to network among those who could become their employers," he says.

Paulsen Moot Court Competition Addresses 8th Amendment Issues
Judges Robert M. Levy, Nina Gershon, and Denny Chin Students in the annual Monrad G. Paulsen Moot Court Competition argued a case about the three-strikes law and the constitutional prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment. The final round was judged by (from left) Judge Robert M. Levy, Eastern District of NY; Judge Nina Gershon, Eastern District of NY; and Judge Denny Chin, Southern District of NY. Carlos Diaz-Cobo '03 won best oralist; Christina Monteiro '04 won runner-up best oralist and best brief; and Sean Armstrong '03 won runner-up best brief.


On-Campus Interviewing Season One Of The Busiest Ever
Kelly R. Camamis '04 Kelly R. Camamis '04 was one of the many students participating in on-campus interviews this year, one of the busiest in Cardozo history. More than 125 employers interviewed students on campus; another 160 from every state and several countries participated in the resume collect program. For the class of 2002, 98.1% reported that they were employed nine months after graduation at an average salary of $89,670. Of those reporting (311 of 317 graduates), 192 or 66% are in private practice, with 50.6% in firms of 101 or more attorneys reporting average salaries in excess of $112,789.

Justice Hugh Laddie Explores Global Impact of IP Law
Honorable Justice Hugh Laddie The Honorable Justice Hugh Laddie of the English Court of Chancery explored the global impact of intellectual property law at this year's Tenzer Lecture. Entitled "Intellectual Property Law: Servant or Tyrant," his lecture focused on intellectual property as a form of regulation and considered the harm of over-regulation. For example, he suggested that the American practice of software patents and better business patents only halts new technology and manufacturing techniques. Justice Laddie also argued that patenting and its potential for economic rewards appears to have distorted university research agendas as scientists turn to applied research.
What is bad for consumers is bad for business and thus for the economy, argued Justice Laddie, who also cautioned against im-posing IP rights uniformly on underdeveloped countries. Laddie added that "IP law is both a moderator and catalyst for our economic system," and urged tailoring its uses to a particular nation's economy.

New Public Affairs Breakfast Forum Features NYC Leaders
Weingarten and Rudenstine Weingarten and Rudenstine
New York City Comptroller William Thompson, NYC Corporation Counsel Michael Cardozo, and Uni-ted Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten '83 addressed students and alumni at a series inaugurated and sponsored by the Cardozo Alumni Associa-tion. The breakfast talks bring to the Cardozo campus issues of local public concern and help integrate Cardozo into the fabric of the city. They also offer students and alumni the opportunity to meet newsmakers. Weingarten, who discussed the New York City school system and pending challenges--including budgetary problems, relationships with City Hall, and measurements for success--declared her admiration for Dean Rudenstine and said, "For me, Cardozo is home."

Talk and Art on Spinoza
Prof. Arthur Jacobson and Benoit Frydman (From left) Conference organizer Prof. Arthur Jacobson and Benoit Frydman, Universite libre de Bruxelles.
Spinoza's Law, cosponsored with and held at the Yeshiva University Museum at the Center for Jewish History, brought scholars from throughout the country for a full day of panels. Topics included Spinoza's critique of prophecy as a source of legal authority, his suggestion that authority flows instead from how a country addresses the welfare of its citizens, Spinoza's influence on modern theories of legal interpretation, and his role as the first theorist of toleration. The conference established that Spinoza was the first completely modern theorist of law and the state, and the first philosopher to un-derstand the metaphysical and epistemological implications of modern science.
The conference was, perhaps, the first legal academic gathering to be "illustrated" by works of art. The museum installed Spinoza's Temple, a series of works on paper by Israeli artist Asaph Ben Menahem inspired by the philosopher's life and career. Ben Menahem attended the conference, giving a tour of his work. The art, the gallery talk, and the conference papers will be printed in a forthcoming issue of the Cardozo Law Review.

Student Wins ABA National Writing Contest
Sarah Gottfried '03, editor in chief of the Cardozo Women's Law Journal (CWLJ), won first place in the 2002 Howard C. Schwab Memorial Award Essay Contest for "Virtual Visita-tion: The Wave of the Future in Communication Between Children and Non-custodial Parents in Relocation Cases." It is a shorter version of a note published in CWLJ's spring 2003 issue (Volume 9, issue 2). The ABA Section of Family Law, sponsor of the prize, awarded Ms. Gottfried $1,500 and a book of her choosing. She chose The Supreme Court and its Justices, Second Edi-tion, which features portraits and writings of legendary justices and discusses landmark cases. Ms. Gottfried learned of the contest and developed her essay last year, when she took Child, Parent and State and Reproductive Technology, taught by Prof. Janet Dolgin, whom she credits with "a tremendous amount of encouragement ... and constructive feedback."

Law Revue Laughs In Both Semesters
The Law Revue
This year, students are presenting Law Revue shows each semester. The first, Law Revue Live!, featured Jeremy S. Goldman '05 and was produced by Joshua Warren '04, Joshua Glick '03, Dave Gross '04, and Jaye Seidlin '03. The spring production, Cardozo Idol, is a take-off on the popular TV show American Idol.



Conference on China and the WTO Held

The participants in China and the WTO: Progress, Perils, and Prospects were (from left) Xu Bu, counselor and director of policy research, PRC's Permanent Mission to the United Nations; Gordon G. Chang, author, The Coming Collapse of China; Prof. Sharon K. Hom, CUNY and managing director, Human Rights in China; Prof. Jerome A. Cohen, NYU School of Law; Elizabeth C. Economy, C.V. Starr senior fellow and director in Asia Studies, Center on Foreign Relations; Adam Qi Li, partner, Jun He Law Offices; Chris X. Lin '92, partner, De Heng, LLP; and Prof. Peter K. Yu '99. Conference cohosts were the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association, the Asian American Bar Association of New York, and the US-China Lawyers Society.

A Busy Semester for Intellectual Property and Dispute Resolution...
(from left) Prof. Susan Scafidi and Prof. Mark A. Lemley
Kenneth Feinberg, special master of the 9/11 Victims&' Compensation Fund, was a panelist for "ADR&'s Response to the Day that Changed the World," sponsored by the Dispute Resolution Society. Other panelists included Kevin Curnin, director, public service project, Stroock, Stroock and Lavan; Prof. Maria Volpe, director, Dispute Resolution Program, John Jay College- CUNY; and Debra Shime, director, Safe Horizon&'s 9/11 Program, who was the moderator.

Kenneth Feinberg
Among scholars presenting works-in-progress at the Second Annual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference were (from left) Prof. Susan Scafidi, Dedman School of Law, on "Intellectual Property, Culture, and Time;" and Prof. Mark A. Lemley, Boalt Hall School of Law, on "Are the U.S. Patent Priority Rules Really Necessary?" Prof. Justin Hughes was a commentator.

(From left) Dennis Arfa, Saguit Saad, and Nile Rogers
Louise E. Dembeck

The Recording Academy Entertainment Law Initiative, together with the ABA Forum on Entertainment and Sports Industries, presented a panel of managers, agents, attorneys, and recording artists speaking on new media and business models affecting the music industry. (From left) Dennis Arfa, agent, QBQ Entertainment; Saguit Saad, Esq., Davis, Shapiro & Lewitt; and Nile Rogers, producer/musician.
Experts from the entertainment industry and ADR field discussed the practicality and applicability of ADR in Entertainment Law. Guest panelists included  Louise E. Dembeck, Esq., president, The American International Arbitration and Conciliation Center for Dispute Resolution (above); Prof. Rosalind Lichter &'82; Hilary Burt, volunteer lawyer, Arts and MediateArt; Robert Freedman, Cowan, DeBaets, Abrahams & Sheppard; Lisa Davis, Frankfurt, Garbus, Kurnit, Klein & Selz; Christine Lepera, Sonneschein, Nath & Rosenthal; and Donald Farber, Jacob, Medinger & Finnegan.

Prof. Jonathan Hyman
Prof. Jonathan Hyman, Rutgers School of Law/ Newark, was a judge at the American Bar Association Regional Negotiation Competition hosted by the Law School. Cardozo&'s team advanced to the finals.






The Jacob Burns Ethics Center and the Public Interest Law Students Association sponsored two panels that focused on the needs of underserved constituents in the legal system. "Will the Criminal Justice System Ever Meet the Needs of Battered Women?" included panelists (from left) Jill Konviser &'90, senior assistant counsel to Governor Pataki; Prof. Linda Mills, New York University; Nina Morrison, executive director, Innocence Project; and Prof. Holly Maguigan, New York University, board member, Clearing House for the Defense of Battered Women. The Women Law Students Association organized the event.
Judge Juanita Bing Newton, deputy chief administrative judge for Justice Initiatives (at left) and Natalie Sobchak, senior staff attorney, Pro Se Office, Southern District of New York, spoke at "Justice Without Lawyers: Pro Se Litigants and the Unauthorized Practice of Law."
...And The Ethics Center, Among Other Programs
(from left) Jill Konviser &'90, Prof. Linda Mills, Nina Morrison, and Prof. Holly Maguigan

Gerald Cohen &'04

The Jacob Burns Ethics Center and the Public Interest Law Students Association sponsored two panels that focused on the needs of underserved constituents in the legal system. "Will the Criminal Justice System Ever Meet the Needs of Battered Women?" included panelists (from left) Jill Konviser &'90, senior assistant counsel to Governor Pataki; Prof. Linda Mills, New York University; Nina Morrison, executive director, Innocence Project; and Prof. Holly Maguigan, New York University, board member, Clearing House for the Defense of Battered Women. The Women Law Students Association organized the event.
The Rockefeller drug laws, their impact, and needed reforms were discussed at a panel organized by the Latin American Law Students Association and Students for a Sensible Drug Policy. Gerald Cohen &'04 (above) introduced the panelists who included Thomas Eddy &'99; William Gibney, Legal Aid Society; Julie Ebenstein, New York Civil Liberties Union; Valerie Vandepanne, writer; and Thomas Leighton, former candidate for governor of New York.
Judge Juanita Bing Newton
Judge Juanita Bing Newton, deputy chief administrative judge for Justice Initiatives (at left) and Natalie Sobchak, senior staff attorney, Pro Se Office, Southern District of New York, spoke at "Justice Without Lawyers: Pro Se Litigants and the Unauthorized Practice of Law."
Hendrik Hartog and Stanley Plesent


Hendrik Hartog, Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor of American Law and Liberty, Princeton University (left), shown with Adjunct Professor Stanley Plesent at the Gloria and Stanley Plesent Lecture, spoke on "Man and Wife in America: Revisiting a History."


Stephen Schulte and Michele Babkine
Dean Rudenstine hosted a luncheon for LL.M. students to meet Board member Stephen Schulte, senior partner, Schulte, Roth & Zabel, who spoke about job-search strategies. Mr. Schulte is shown here with Michele Babkine &'03, who graduated in January and is now working at Davis Polk & Wardwell.